New to the Collection: January 2024

We are adding new books, movies, audiobooks, and music to our collection all the time. Check here each month to find the latest additions.

 

Fiction

 

The Covenant of Water, Abraham Verghese

Spanning the years 1900 to 1977, The Covenant of Water is set in Kerala, on South India’s Malabar Coast, and follows three generations of a family that suffers a peculiar affliction: in every generation, at least one person dies by drowning—and in Kerala, water is everywhere. At the turn of the century, a twelve-year-old girl from Kerala’s long-existing Christian community, grieving the death of her father, is sent by boat to her wedding, where she will meet her forty-year-old husband for the first time. From this unforgettable new beginning, the young girl—and future matriarch, known as Big Ammachi—will witness unthinkable changes over the span of her extraordinary life, full of joy and triumph as well as hardship and loss, her faith and love the only constants.

 

Woman, Eating, Claire Kohda

Lydia is hungry. She’s always wanted to try Japanese food. Sashimi, ramen, onigiri with sour plum stuffed inside – the food her Japanese father liked to eat. And then there is bubble tea and iced-coffee, ice cream and cake, and foraged herbs and plants, and the vegetables grown by the other young artists at the London studio space she is secretly squatting in. But, Lydia can’t eat any of these things. Her body doesn’t work like those of other people. The only thing she can digest is blood, and it turns out that sourcing fresh pigs’ blood in London – where she is living away from her vampire mother for the first time – is much more difficult than she’d anticipated. As Lydia develops as a woman and an artist, she will learn that she must reconcile the conflicts within her – between her demon and human sides, her mixed ethnic heritage, and her relationship with food, and, in turn, humans – if she is to find a way to exist in the world. Before any of this, however, she must eat.

 

The Paris Daughter, Kristin Harmel

Paris, 1939: Young mothers Elise and Juliette become fast friends the day they meet in the beautiful Bois de Boulogne. Though there is a shadow of war creeping across Europe, neither woman suspects that their lives are about to irrevocably change. When Elise becomes a target of the German occupation, she entrusts Juliette with the most precious thing in her life—her young daughter, playmate to Juliette’s own little girl. But nowhere is safe in war, not even a quiet little bookshop like Juliette’s Librairie des Rêves, and, when a bomb falls on their neighborhood, Juliette’s world is destroyed along with it. More than a year later, with the war finally ending, Elise returns to reunite with her daughter, only to find her friend’s bookstore reduced to rubble—and Juliette nowhere to be found. What happened to her daughter in those last, terrible moments? Juliette has seemingly vanished without a trace, taking all the answers with her. Elise’s desperate search leads her to New York—and to Juliette—one final, fateful time.

 

What You Are Looking For is in the Library, Michiko Aoyama

What are you looking for? So asks Tokyo’s most enigmatic librarian. For Sayuri Komachi is able to sense exactly what each visitor to her library is searching for and provide just the book recommendation to help them find it. A restless retail assistant looks to gain new skills, a mother tries to overcome demotion at work after maternity leave, a conscientious accountant yearns to open an antique store, a recently retired salaryman searches for newfound purpose. In Komachi’s unique book recommendations they will find just what they need to achieve their dreams.

 

Where the Dead Wait, Ally Wilkes

William Day should be an acclaimed Arctic explorer. But after a failed expedition, in which his remaining men only survived by eating their dead comrades, he returned in disgrace. Thirteen years later, his second-in-command, Jesse Stevens, has gone missing in the same frozen waters. Perhaps this is Day’s chance to restore his tarnished reputation by bringing Stevens­­—the man who’s haunted his whole life—back home. But when the rescue mission becomes an uncanny journey into his past, Day must face up to the things he’s done.

 

Welcome Home, Stranger, Kate Christensen

An environmental journalist in Washington, DC, Rachel has shunned her New England working-class family for years. Divorced and childless in her middle age, she’s a true independent spirit with the pain and experience to prove it. Coping with challenges large and small, she thinks her life is in free fall–until she’s summoned home to deal with the aftermath of her mother’s death. Then things really fall apart. Surrounded by a cast of sometimes comic, sometimes heartbreakingly serious characters—an arriviste sister, an alcoholic brother-in-law and, most importantly, the love of her life recently married to the sister’s best friend–Rachel must come to terms with her past, the sorrow she has long buried, and the ghost of the mother who, for better and worse, made her the woman she is.

 

Small Mercies, Dennis Lehane

In the summer of 1974 a heatwave blankets Boston and Mary Pat Fennessy is trying to stay one step ahead of the bill collectors. Mary Pat has lived her entire life in the housing projects of “Southie,” the Irish American enclave that stubbornly adheres to old tradition and stands proudly apart. One night Mary Pat’s teenage daughter Jules stays out late and doesn’t come home. That same evening, a young Black man is found dead, struck by a subway train under mysterious circumstances. The two events seem unconnected. But Mary Pat, propelled by a desperate search for her missing daughter, begins turning over stones best left untouched—asking questions that bother Marty Butler, chieftain of the Irish mob, and the men who work for him, men who don’t take kindly to any threat to their business.

 

The Wildest Sun, Asha Lemmie

When tragedy forces Delphine Auber, an aspiring writer on the cusp of adulthood, from her home in postwar Paris, she seizes the opportunity to embark on the journey she’s long dreamed of: finding the father she has never known. But her quest—spanning from Paris to New York’s Harlem, to Havana and Key West—is complicated by the fact that she believes him to be famed luminary Ernest Hemingway, a man just as elusive as he is iconic. She desperately yearns for his approval, as both a daughter and a writer, convinced that he holds the key to who she’s truly meant to be. But what will happen if she is wrong, or if her real story falls outside of the legend of her parentage that she’s revered all her life? 

 

Manner of Death, Robin Cook

After Dr. Jack Stapleton’s near-death confrontation with a medical serial killer, his wife, NYC Chief Medical Examiner Laurie Montgomery, is carrying the load both at work and at home. When Laurie insists that Dr. Ryan Sullivan—an underperforming senior pathology resident who is spending his required month at the medical examiner’s office but who truly detests doing forensic autopsies—assist her on a suicide autopsy in hopes of stimulating his interest in the field, the last thing she expects is to be unwittingly drawn into a major conspiracy that puts her own life in jeopardy. 

 

The Heaven and Earth Grocery Store, James McBride

In 1972, when workers in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, were digging the foundations for a new development, the last thing they expected to find was a skeleton at the bottom of a well. Who the skeleton was and how it got there were two of the long-held secrets kept by the residents of Chicken Hill, the dilapidated neighborhood where immigrant Jews and African Americans lived side by side and shared ambitions and sorrows. Chicken Hill was where Moshe and Chona Ludlow lived when Moshe integrated his theater and where Chona ran the Heaven & Earth Grocery Store. When the state came looking for a deaf boy to institutionalize him, it was Chona and Nate Timblin, the Black janitor at Moshe’s theater and the unofficial leader of the Black community on Chicken Hill, who worked together to keep the boy safe.

 

The Beach at Summerly, Beatriz Williams

June 1946. As the residents of Winthrop Island prepare for the first summer season after the sacrifice of war, a glamorous new figure moves into the guest cottage at Summerly, the idyllic seaside estate of the wealthy Peabody family. To Emilia Winthrop, daughter of Summerly’s year-round caretaker and a descendant of the island’s settlers, Olive Rainsford opens a window into a world of shining possibility. While Emilia spent the war years caring for her incapacitated mother, Olive traveled the world, married fascinating men, and involved herself in political causes. She’s also the beloved aunt of the two surviving Peabody sons, Amory and Shep, with whom Emilia has a tangled romantic history. But the heady promise of Peabody patronage is blown apart by the arrival of Sumner Fox, an FBI agent who demands Emilia’s help to capture a Soviet agent who’s transmitting vital intelligence on the West’s atomic weapon program from somewhere inside the Summerly estate.

 

The Night Island, Jayne Ann Krentz

Talia March, Pallas Llewellyn, and Amelia Rivers, bonded by a night none of them can remember, are dedicated to uncovering the mystery of what really happened to them months ago—an experience that amplified innate psychic abilities in each of them. The women suspect they were test subjects years earlier, and that there are more people like them—all they have to do is find the list of others who took that same test. When Talia follows up on a lead from Phoebe, a fan of the trio’s podcast, she discovers that the informant has vanished. Talia isn’t the only one looking for Phoebe, however. Luke Rand, a hunted and haunted man who is chasing the same list that Talia is after, also shows up at the meeting place. It’s clear he has his own agenda, and they are instantly suspicious of each other. But when a killer begins to stalk them, they realize they have to join forces to find Phoebe and the list.

 

Mystery

 

Resurrection Walk (A Lincoln Lawyer novel), Michael Connelly

Defense attorney Mickey Haller is back, taking the long shot cases, where the chances of winning are one in a million. After getting a wrongfully convicted man out of prison, he is inundated with pleas from incarcerated people claiming innocence. He enlists his half brother, retired LAPD Detective Harry Bosch, to weed through the letters, knowing most claims will be false. Bosch pulls a needle from the haystack: a woman in prison for killing her husband, a sheriff’s deputy, but who still maintains her innocence. Bosch reviews the case and sees elements that don’t add up, and a sheriff’s department intent on bringing quick justice in the killing of one of its own.

 

The Proof of the Pudding (A Royal Spyness Mystery), Rhys Bowen

Lady Georgiana Rannoch is looking forward to her first ever turn as hostess for her very own house party. The dinner party is a smashing success. Sir Mortimer Mordred—famous author of creepy Gothic horror novels—is one of the guests. He recently purchased a nearby Elizabethan manor nearby because it has a famous poison garden. After the dinner, Sir Mortimer approaches Georgie and asks to borrow her new chef for his upcoming party, and Georgie and Darcy, her dashing husband, are invited! The tour of the poison garden is fascinating, as is Sir Mortimer’s laboratory. Shockingly, just after the banquet several of the guests become sick.  And one dies, apparently poisoned by berries from the garden. But how could this be when they all ate the same meal and the same delectable dessert?

 

Everyone in my Family Has Killed Someone, Benjamin Stevenson

Everyone in my family has killed someone. Some of us, the high achievers, have killed more than once. I’m not trying to be dramatic, but it is the truth. Some of us are good, others are bad, and some just unfortunate. I’m Ernest Cunningham. Call me Ern or Ernie. I wish I’d killed whoever decided our family reunion should be at a ski resort, but it’s a little more complicated than that. Have I killed someone? Yes. I have. Who was it?

 

Paws to Remember (A Magical Cats Mystery), Sofie Kelly

Librarian Kathleen Paulson and her enchanted felines get involved in a cold case that is putting people in very hot water. When a water leak repair results in a body being found behind the walls of the store run by the artists’ co-op that Kathleen’s friend, Maggie, is part of everyone is completely mystified as to whose body it is and who hid it there. But as the dust settles, her boyfriend, Detective Marcus Gordon, begins to suspect the body could belong to a young woman who disappeared more than thirty years ago. When a friend with a connection to the young woman asks Kathleen to look into the circumstances around the disappearance, she and her cats—who have special feline talent for catching felons—find themselves digging up secrets that at least one person in Mayville Heights would much prefer stay buried.

 

Breakup (A Kate Shugak Mystery), Dana Stabenow

Kate Shugak’s loyalties – to the land, her heritage, her home – are put to the test when a series of mishaps lead to murder. April in Alaska is typically a period of rebirth and renewal, and after the long winter Kate has nothing more strenuous on her agenda than paying her taxes. But mayhem abounds as the meltoff flows; this year’s thaw is accompanied by rampaging bears, family feuds, and a plane crash quite literally in Kate’s own backyard. What begins as a series of headaches escalates into possible murder when a dead body is found near her homestead. Initially unwilling to involve herself in the investigation, preferring instead to write off each odd occurrence as a breakup-related peculiarity, Kate is drawn irresistibly to seek the truth. Compelled by her friends to act as problem solver and guided by the spirit of her Aleut grandmother, she finds herself slowly taking on the role of clan leader, a post she is bound to by.

 

Mother-Daughter Murder Night, Nina Simon

High-powered businesswoman Lana Rubicon has a lot to be proud of: her keen intelligence, impeccable taste, and the L.A. real estate empire she’s built. But when she finds herself trapped 300 miles north of the city, convalescing in a sleepy coastal town with her adult daughter Beth and teenage granddaughter Jack, Lana is stuck counting otters instead of square footage—and hoping that boredom won’t kill her before the cancer does. Then Jack—tiny in stature but fiercely independent—happens upon a dead body while kayaking. She quickly becomes a suspect in the homicide investigation, and the Rubicon women are thrown into chaos. Beth thinks Lana should focus on recovery, but Lana has a better idea. She’ll pull on her wig, find the true murderer, protect her family, and prove she still has power.

 

Science-Fiction

 

The Future, Naomi Alderman

When Martha Einkorn fled her father’s isolated compound in Oregon, she never expected to find herself working for a powerful social media mogul hell-bent on controlling everything. Now, she’s surrounded by mega-rich companies designing private weather, predictive analytics, and covert weaponry, while spouting technological prophecy. Martha may have left the cult, but it seems like the apocalyptic warnings in her father’s fox and rabbit sermon are starting to come true. Across the world, in Singapore, Lai Zhen, an internet-famous survivalist, flees from an assassin. She’s cornered, desperate, and might die without ever knowing what’s going on. Suddenly, a remarkable piece of software appears on her phone telling her exactly how to escape. Who made it? What is it really for? And if those behind it can save her from danger, what do they want from her, and what else do they know about the future?

 

Generation Ship, Michael Mammay

In 2108, colony ship Voyager departed Earth for the planet of Promissa with eighteen thousand of the world’s best and brightest on board. Two hundred fifty years and twenty-seven light years later, an arrival is imminent. But all is not well. The probes they’ve sent ahead to gather the data needed to establish any kind of settlement are not responding, and they information they have received has presented more questions than answers. It’s a time when the entire crew should be coming together to solve the problem, but science officer Sheila Jackson can’t get people to listen. As alliances form and fall, Governor Jarred Pantel sees only one way to bring Voyager’s citizens together and secure his own power: a full-scale colonization effort.

 

Romance

 

Practice Makes Perfect, Sarah Adams

Annie Walker is on a quest to find her perfect match–someone who complements her happy, quiet life running the local flower shop in Rome, Kentucky. But finding her dream man may be harder than Annie imagined. Everyone knows everyone in her hometown, and the dating prospects are getting fewer by the day. After she overhears her latest date say that she is boring, Annie starts to think the problem might be her. Is it too late to become flirtatious and fun? Maybe she only needs a little practice. And Annie has the perfect person in mind to be her tutor.

 

Graphic Novels

 

Lore Olympus: Volume 2, Rachel Smythe

Persephone was ready to start a new life when she left the mortal realm for Olympus. However, she quickly discovered the dark side of her glamorous new home—from the relatively minor gossip threatening her reputation to a realm-shattering violation of her safety by the conceited Apollo—and she’s struggling to find her footing in the fast-moving realm of the gods. Hades is also off-balance, fighting against his burgeoning feelings for the young goddess of spring while maintaining his lonely rule of the Underworld. As the pair are drawn ever closer, they must untangle the twisted webs of their past and present to build toward a new future. 

 

Unforgotten, Tohby Riddle

Nobody knows where they come from.

But they come.

Impossible birds of the big sky

and the long night…

So begins this timely and timeless story, told in magnificent images and words by master storyteller, Tohby Riddle. A triumph of quiet beauty.

 

The Instinct for Cooperation: A Graphic Novel Conversation with Noam Chomsky & Jeffrey Wilson

An astonishing graphic novel that brings Chomsky’s political analysis to bear on real people’s stories on the front lines of America’s struggle for economic justice and human dignity. The Instinct for Cooperation innovatively balances those stories with conversations the author had with Chomsky on how best to understand them. Although the themes are wide-ranging, this book is ultimately about the importance of and need for spaces of resistance in counter state and other institutional forms of violence.

 

The Night Eaters, Book 2: Her Little Reapers, Marjorie Liu & Sana Takeda

It’s been four months since the night of gore, chaos, and the failed demonic summoning that revealed the Ting twins’ unusual family background. Since then, Milly and Billy have tried to explore their new powers, but their parents, Ipo and Keon, haven’t been much help. Despite the lack of explanations, one thing is abundantly clear: the Ting family is part of a much larger supernatural world and something in that world is very, very wrong. As Ipo and Keon are reluctantly drawn back into the treacherous high society of supernatural elites, their children find that dealings with the spirit world comes at a steep price—when the dead have unfinished business with the living, only blood can balance the scales. To save humanity and themselves, the Tings will have to embrace their inner demons.

 

Poetry

 

A Thousand Mornings, Mary Oliver

The New York Times-bestselling collection of poems from celebrated poet Mary Oliver. In A Thousand Mornings, Mary Oliver returns to the imagery that has come to define her life’s work, transporting us to the marshland and coastline of her beloved home, Provincetown, Massachusetts. Whether studying the leaves of a tree or mourning her treasured dog Percy, Oliver is open to the teachings contained in the smallest of moments and explores with startling clarity, humor, and kindness the mysteries of our daily experience.

 

The Odyssey, Homer (translated by Emily Wilson)

Composed at the rosy-fingered dawn of world literature almost three millennia ago, The Odyssey is a poem about violence and the aftermath of war; about wealth, poverty, and power; about marriage and family; about travelers, hospitality, and yearning for home. This fresh, authoritative translation captures the beauty of this ancient poem as well as the drama of its narrative. Written in iambic pentameter verse and a vivid, contemporary idiom, Emily Wilson’s Odyssey sings with a voice that matches Homer’s original.

 

Nonfiction

 

Year-Round Indoor Salad Gardening: How to Grow Nutrient-Dense, Soil-Sprouted Greens in Less Than 10 Days, Peter Burke

Did you know that you can grow all the fresh salad greens you need throughout the entire year – including the winter months – with no lights, no pumps, no greenhouse, and little more than a cupboard and a windowsill? Longtime gardener and author Peter Burke proves you can. This book is an inviting guide that will have first-time and experienced gardeners alike discovering the fun and productive world of indoor salad gardening.

 

Modern Homestead: Grow, Raise, Create, Renee Wilkinson

Join sixth-generation gardener and homesteader Renee Wilkinson as she gets back to basics and shows you how to transform your urban space into a sustainable home. Whether your outdoor plot is a small apartment balcony or a large backyard, you can grow, preserve, and create a harvest of vegetables, canned goods, eggs, honey, and even cleaning products, to enrich your modern lifestyle.

 

Harvest: Unexpected Projects Using 47 Extraordinary Garden Plants, Stefani Bittner & Aletha Harampolis

Every garden–not just vegetable plots–can produce a bountiful harvest! This practical, inspirational, and seasonal guide will help make any garden more productive and enjoyable with a variety of projects using unexpected and often common garden plants, some of which may already be growing in your backyard.Discover the surprising usefulness of petals and leaves, roots, seeds, and fruit: turn turmeric root into a natural dye and calamintha into lip balm. Make anise hyssop into a refreshing iced tea and turn apricots into a facial mask. Crabapple branches can be used to create stunning floral arrangements, oregano flowers to infuse vinegar, and edible chrysanthemum to liven up a salad. With the remarkable, multi-purpose plants in Harvest, there is always something for gardeners to harvest from one growing season to the next.

 

The Great Big Pumpkin Cookbook: A Quick and Easy Guide to Making Pancakes, Soups, Breads, Pastas, Cakes, Cookies, and More, Maggie Michalczyk

Pumpkin is not just for pie. With help from Maggie Michalczyk, you can discover brand-new ways to use your pumpkin, whether fresh or canned. Don’t leave your pumpkin for fall baking – now with The Great Big Pumpkin Cookbook, you can eat amazing pumpkin recipes all year round.

 

Index, a History of the: A Bookish Adventure from Medieval Manuscripts to the Digital Age, Dennis Duncan

Buried in the back of the book, we find the secret world of the index: an unsung but extraordinary everyday tool, with an illustrious but little-known past. Charting its curious path from the monasteries and universities of thirteenth-century Europe to Silicon Valley in the twenty-first, Dennis Duncan uncovers how the index has saved heretics from the stake, kept politicians from high office, and made us all into the readers we are today.

 

Fathoms: The World in the Whale, Rebecca Giggs

When writer Rebecca Giggs encountered a humpback whale stranded on her local beachfront in Australia, she began to wonder how the lives of whales reflect the condition of our oceans. How do whales experience ecological change? How has whale culture been both understood and changed by human technology? What can observing whales teach us about the complexity, splendor, and fragility of life on earth? In Fathoms, we learn about whales so rare they have never been named, whale songs that sweep across hemispheres in annual waves of popularity, and whales that have modified the chemical composition of our planet’s atmosphere. We travel to Japan to board the ships that hunt whales and delve into the deepest seas to discover how plastic pollution pervades our earth’s undersea environment.

 

Beethoven in the Bunker: Musicians Under the Nazi Regime, Fred Brouwers

While Hitler sat secretly enjoying previously recorded music in his bunker, musicians made of flesh and blood were denied a means of making a living. They died in concentration camps or in other war-related circumstances. They survived but ended up in psychiatric care; they managed to flee just in time; they sided with the regime—out of conviction or coercion—or they joined the resistance. From fiery conductor Arturo Toscanini, who defied Mussolini and Hitler, to opportunistic composer Richard Strauss and antisemitic pianist Elly Ney, who collaborated with the Third Reich to varying extents and for different reasons, Fred Brouwers profiles the complex figures of this extraordinarily fascinating chapter in music history.

 

Conversations with People Who Hate Me: 12 Things I Learned from Talking to Internet Strangers, Dylan Marron

In an internet era characterized by comment section wars, devastating clapbacks, and anonymous vitriol, Dylan Marron explores what happens when online feuders step out from behind the keyboard and get to know the human on the other side of the screen. Join Dylan as he connects people who have clashed online – from old friends to complete strangers — to explore why we believe what we believe, how we relate to each other on the internet, and just what a phone call can accomplish.

 

How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence, Michael Pollan

When Michael Pollan set out to research how LSD and psilocybin (the active ingredient in magic mushrooms) are being used to provide relief to people suffering from difficult-to-treat conditions such as depression, addiction and anxiety, he did not intend to write what is undoubtedly his most personal book. But upon discovering how these remarkable substances are improving the lives not only of the mentally ill but also of healthy people coming to grips with the challenges of everyday life, he decided to explore the landscape of the mind in the first person as well as the third. Thus began a singular adventure into various altered states of consciousness, along with a dive deep into both the latest brain science and the thriving underground community of psychedelic therapists. Pollan sifts the historical record to separate the truth about these mysterious drugs from the myths that have surrounded them since the 1960s, when a handful of psychedelic evangelists inadvertently catalyzed a powerful backlash against what was then a promising field of research.

 

The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread, Cailin O’Connor & James Owen Weatherall

Why should we care about having true beliefs? And why do demonstrably false beliefs persist and spread despite bad, even fatal, consequences for the people who hold them? Philosophers of science Cailin O’Connor and James Weatherall argue that social factors, rather than individual psychology, are what’s essential to understanding the spread and persistence of false beliefs. It might seem that there’s an obvious reason that true beliefs matter: false beliefs will hurt you. But if that’s right, then why is it (apparently) irrelevant to many people whether they believe true things or not?

 

Future Care: Sensors, Artificial Intelligence, and the Reinvention of Medicine, Jag Singh

A renowned cardiologist and Harvard professor spells out  the future digital shift of medicine — and how it will impact the lives not only of patients and health care professionals but of all humans. Future care is virtual care: sensor-aided, digitally enabled, and powered by predictive analytics. Like most facets of modern life, human organs, too, are being digitally monitored. Sensors are well on their way to helping us proactively capture the information needed to predict and prevent disease. Paired with the medical world’s growing emphasis on wellness and prevention, the digital revolution will help us effectively monitor and address the chronic diseases that have been the Achilles’ heel of the health care system to date. This large-scale transition is not only going to reshape the patient-physician relationship but also dramatically change how hospitals and the business of medicine operate.

 

Major Labels: A History of Popular Music in Seven Genres, Kelefa Sanneh

In Major Labels, Kelefa Sanneh, one of the essential voices of our time on music and culture, has made a deep study of popular music and how it unites and divides us. Sanneh shows how musical genres have been defined by the tension between mainstream and outsider, authenticity and phoniness, right and wrong. He upends familiar ideas of musical greatness as he relays the history of each genre and the artists and events that have shaped them. This is a book about the music everyone loves, the music everyone hates, and the decades-long argument over which is which.

 

God’s Monsters: Vengeful Spirits, Deadly Angels, Hybrid Creature, and Divine Hitmen of the Bible, Esther J. Hamori

The Bible is teeming with monsters. Giants tromp through the land of milk and honey; Leviathan swims through the wine-dark sea. A stunning array of peculiar creatures, mind-altering spirits, and supernatural hitmen fill the biblical heavens, jarring in both their strangeness and their propensity for violence–especially on God’s behalf. Traditional interpretations of the creatures of the Bible have sanded down their sharp, unsavory edges, transforming them into celestial beings of glory and light–or chubby, happy cherubs. Those cherubs? They’re actually hybrid guardian monsters, more closely associated with the Egyptian sphinx than with flying babies. And the seraphim? Winged serpents sent to mete out God’s vengeance. Demons aren’t at war with angels; they’re a distinct supernatural species used by Satan and by God. The pattern is chilling. Most of these monsters aren’t God’s opponents–they’re God’s entourage.

 

Songs on Endless Repeat: Essays and Outtakes, Anthony Veasna So

The late Anthony Veasna So’s debut story collection, Afterparties, was a landmark publication. And he was equally known for his comic, soulful essays, published in n+1, The New Yorker, and The Millions. Songs on Endless Repeat gathers those essays together, along with previously unpublished fiction. Written with razor-sharp wit and an unflinching eye, the essays examine his youth in California, the lives of his refugee parents, his intimate friendships, loss, pop culture, and more. And in linked fiction following three Cambodian American cousins who stand to inherit their late aunt’s illegitimate loan-sharking business, So explores community, grief, and longing with inimitable humor and depth.

 

The Lost Tomb: And Other Real-Life Stories of Bones, Burials, and Murder, Douglas Preston

From the jungles of Honduras to macabre archaeological sites in the American Southwest, Douglas Preston’s journalistic explorations have taken him across the globe. He broke the story of an extraordinary mass grave of animals killed by the asteroid impact that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs, he explored what lay hidden in the booby-trapped Money Pit on Oak Island, and he roamed the haunted hills of Italy in search of the Monster of Florence. When he hasn’t been co-authoring bestselling thrillers featuring FBI Agent Pendergast, Preston has been writing about some of the world’s strangest and most dramatic mysteries.

 

Street Food Vietnam: Noodles, Salads, Pho, Spring Rolls, Banh Mi & More, Jerry Mai

Vietnamese street food is – inarguably – one of the world’s most dynamic cuisines. This book brings the flavor and spirit of those bustling streets to your home. Author Jerry Mai is a master of street food. She owns a number of restaurants specializing in nuanced flavors of Vietnamese street pho. Throughout this book, Jerry presents street food from the length of the country. There’s banh mi, rice paper rolls, Vietnamese-style omelets, lemongrass and fresh herb infused stir-fries, fresh noodle salads and so much more. Learn the subtle finesse that distinguishes a Hanoi style pho from its southern relative.

 

Biography

 

Wifedom: Mrs. Orwell’s Invisible Life, Anna Funder

At the end of summer 2017, Anna Funder found herself at a moment of peak overload. Family obligations and household responsibilities were crushing her soul and taking her away from her writing deadlines. She needed help, and George Orwell came to her rescue. But then she read about his forgotten wife, and it was a revelation. Eileen O’Shaughnessy married Orwell in 1936. O’Shaughnessy was a writer herself, and her literary brilliance not only shaped Orwell’s work, but her practical common sense saved his life. But why and how, Funder wondered, was she written out of their story? Using newly discovered letters from Eileen to her best friend, Funder re-creates the Orwells’ marriage, through the Spanish Civil War and the Second World War in London. As she peeks behind the curtain of Orwell’s private life she is led to question what it takes to be a writer—and what it is to be a wife.

 

My Name is Barbra, Barbra Streisand

Barbra Streisand is by any account a living legend, a woman who in a career spanning six decades has excelled in every area of entertainment. She is among the handful of EGOT winners (Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony) and has one of the greatest and most recognizable voices in the history of popular music. She has been nominated for a Grammy 46 times, and with Yentl she became the first woman to write, produce, direct, and star in a major motion picture. In My Name Is Barbra, she tells her own story about her life and extraordinary career, from growing up in Brooklyn to her first star-making appearances in New York nightclubs to her breakout performance in Funny Girl on stage and winning the Oscar for that performance on film. Then came a long string of successes in every medium in the years that followed. The book is, like Barbra herself, frank, funny, opinionated, and charming

 

Dangerous Company: The Misadventures of a “Foreign Agent”, Sam Patten

When Washington went on the hunt for anyone who could have helped the Russians elect Donald Trump as US president, Patten was a “usual suspect.” Following charges referred by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, in 2018 he was convicted of failing to register as a foreign agent under a seldom-enforced 1938 statute. In Dangerous Company, Patten gives us front-row seats to Russia during Vladimir Putin’s early years, the newly independent states where “color revolutions” ushered in both democratic change and more corruption, and the inside of a legal hurricane that consumed the Trump administration.

 

In the Dream House, Carmen Maria Machado

A searing account of a harrowing relationship with a charismatic but volatile woman. Each chapter in this wildly inventive memoir is driven by its own narrative trope—the haunted house, erotica, the bildungsroman—through which Machado holds her story up to the light, examining it from different angles. She considers her religious adolescence, unpacks the stereotype of lesbian relationships as safe and utopian, and widens the view with essayistic explorations of the history and reality of abuse in queer relationships.

 

High Notes: A Rock Memoir, Richard Loren (with Stephen Abney)

A music agent’s coast-to-coast coming of age from the 1960s to the 1980s when rock music was a movement. Hosting Liberace in a summer tent theatre and bailing Jim Morrison out of jail are only a few of Loren’s often surreal, rite-of-passage experiences in the music business.

 

Out at the Plate: The Dot Wilkinson Story, Lynn Ames

t’s not simply that Dot Wilkinson was one of the most decorated women’s softball players, bowlers, and athletes of all time and one of the original players from the three-time world champion PBSW Phoenix Ramblers softball team (1933–1965). Nor was it the length of her time here on Earth—over a century—although any of these things by itself would be impressive.

The magic of Dot’s story is in the details. It’s the tale of a childhood spent in poverty, an indomitable, unbreakable spirit, a determination to be the very best to play whatever sport she undertook, the independence to live her personal life on her own terms, and her tremendous success at all of it. Over more than a decade of countless conversations and interviews, Dot shared all of it with her dear friend, author Lynn Ames. Dot held nothing back.

 

Desert Solitaire, Edward Abbey

Desert Solitaire is a collection of vignettes about life in the wilderness and the nature of the desert itself by park ranger and conservationist, Edward Abbey. The bookdetails the unique adventures and conflicts the author faces, from dealing with the damage caused by development of the land or excessive tourism, to discovering a dead body. However, this is not just a collection of one man’s stories, the book is also a philosophical memoir, full of Abbey’s reflections on the desert as a paradox, at once beautiful and liberating, but also isolating and cruel. Often compared to Thoreau’s Walden, Desert Solitaire is a powerful discussion of life’s mysteries set against the stirring backdrop of the American southwestern wilderness.

 

Large Print

 

The Heaven and Earth Grocery Store, James McBride

In 1972, when workers in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, were digging the foundations for a new development, the last thing they expected to find was a skeleton at the bottom of a well. Who the skeleton was and how it got there were two of the long-held secrets kept by the residents of Chicken Hill, the dilapidated neighborhood where immigrant Jews and African Americans lived side by side and shared ambitions and sorrows. Chicken Hill was where Moshe and Chona Ludlow lived when Moshe integrated his theater and where Chona ran the Heaven & Earth Grocery Store. When the state came looking for a deaf boy to institutionalize him, it was Chona and Nate Timblin, the Black janitor at Moshe’s theater and the unofficial leader of the Black community on Chicken Hill, who worked together to keep the boy safe.

 

The Secret (Jack Reacher), Lee Child

  1. All across the United States respectable, upstanding citizens are showing up dead. These deaths could be accidents, and they don’t appear to be connected—until a fatal fall from a high-floor window attracts some unexpected attention. That attention comes from the secretary of defense. All of a sudden he wants an interagency task force to investigate. And he wants Jack Reacher as the army’s representative. If Reacher gets a result, great. If not, he’s a convenient fall guy. But office politics isn’t Reacher’s thing. Three questions quickly emerge: Who’s with him, who’s against him, and will the justice he dispenses be the official kind . . . or his own kind?

 

Audiobooks

 

The Woman in Me, Britney Spears

A brave and astonishingly moving story about freedom, fame, motherhood, survival, faith, and hope. In June 2021, the whole world was listening as Britney Spears spoke in open court. The impact of sharing her voice was undeniable, and it changed the course of her life. Written with remarkable candor and humor, Spears’ groundbreaking memoir illuminates the enduring power of music and love – and the importance of a woman telling her own story on her own terms.

 

DVDs

 

A Haunting in Venice

Retired and living in Venice, Hercule Poirot (Kenneth Branagh) reluctantly attends a séance where a murdered guest thrusts the detective into a sinister, shadowy world.

 

Burton and Taylor

Tempestuous, funny, and outrageously glamorous, Hollywood’s most famous on-again-off-again lovers flare to life in their last battle. Helena Bonham Carter and Dominic West star as the charmed and reckless couple, one-time lovebirds now locked in an ill-fated revival of Noel Coward’s Private Lives.

 

The Sandman (Season 1)

There is another world that waits for all of us when we close our eyes and sleep – a place called the Dreaming, where the Sandman, Master of Dreams (Tom Sturrige), gives shape to all of our deepest fears and fantasies. But when Dream is unexpectedly captured and held captive for a century, his absence sets off a series of events that will change both the dreaming and waking worlds forever.

 

Poldark (Series 1 & 2)

The romantic saga follows Ross Poldark (Robin Ellis) as he loses his fiancée, the well-bred beauty, Elizabeth (Jill Townsend), to his cousin Francis (Clive Francis). Ross ends up marrying his servant, Demelza Carne (Angharad Rees), but his passion for Elizabeth simmers on for years. Set in late 18th century Cornwall, the plot follows Ross Poldark’s attempts to make his derelict copper mines a success. Life is hard, smuggling is rife and Ross Poldark finds himself taking the side of the underclass against the ruthless behavior of his enemies, the greedy Warleggan clan including George Warleggan (Ralph Bates).

 

Matrix Reloaded

Freedom fighters Neo (Keanu Reeves), Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss) and Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne) continue to lead the revolt against the Machine Army, unleashing their arsenal of extraordinary skills and weaponry against the systematic forces of repression and exploitation. Sequel to the original Matrix.

 

Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny

Daredevil archaeologist Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford) races against time to retrieve a legendary dial that can change the course of history. Accompanied by his goddaughter, he soon finds himself squaring off against Jürgen Voller, a former Nazi who works for NASA. The final installment in the iconic franchise.

 

Expendables 4

A new generation of stars is added to the adrenaline-fueled adventure of The Expendables. As the highly-skilled mercenaries take on an arms dealer and his private army with every weapon they can get their hands on, the new recruits bring daring styles and tactics that give “new blood” a whole new meaning.

 

The League

A celebration of Negro League baseball’s triumphs and challenges through the first half of the twentieth century, The League explores Black baseball as an economic and social pillar of Black communities and a stage for some of the greatest athletes to ever play the game, while also examining the unintended consequences of integration.

 

2000 Miles to Maine: Adventures on the Appalachian Trail

Inspired by Bill Bryson’s A Walk in the Woods, director Douglas Morse and producer Heidi Estes traveled to the southern terminus of the Appalachian Trail in Georgia. They became fascinated with all the hikers they met, from Jack, who got stuck with an angry dog, to Malice and Kentucky, the Cheech of Chong of the A.T., to Matt and Angie, who plan to get married on the trail.

 

The Creator

Amidst a future war between humans and AI, an ex-special forces agent (John David Washington) grieving the disappearance of his wife (Gemma Chan) is recruited to kill an AI architect who has developed a mysterious weapon that could end humankind.